This medical travel insurance site provides insight and tips on things to consider when travelling as a diabetic such as what to pack and airport security. It also contains information on other useful links and how to keep safe. 

This chapter from the World Health Organization on violence and injury prevention examines elder abuse in a variety of settings, including individual risk factors, relationship factors, community and societal factors, the consequence of elder abuse, examples of local and national responses, the role of health care in addressing this issue, education and public awareness campaigns as well as recommendations. 24 pages. Last reviewed May 2017.

Elder abuse or neglect is when there is violence against seniors or mistreatment of seniors, including neglect of seniors who depend on others for care. Abuse or neglect may take many different forms including physical, sexual, emotional, and financial. Many types of abuse, and some types of neglect, are criminal offences.

Older Canadians are valuable members of our communities, yet many are vulnerable to various forms of ageism, abuse, mistreatment and isolation from the same communities that also value them. Ageism is commonly understood to be, “the stereotyping of, and discrimination against, individuals or groups because of their age”. While this can include those who are young or old, ageism appears to be a more significant issue for older members of our society.  Indeed, many have come to remark how this form of discrimination still appears to be the last acceptable ‘ism’ in our society.

This resource is intended to help raise awareness of issues of senior abuse in the lives of senior Aboriginal women, their families and communities. It is meant to help promote the safety and well-being of our seniors and Elders, both women and men, and to honour them as they would be traditionally.

Financial abuse is the most common form of elder abuse in Canada. Financial abuse can happen at any time, but it will often start after a health crisis or after the death of a spouse, partner or close friend. People who are alone, lonely or in poor health are more vulnerable.

The CASE tool was created by Myrna Reis and Daphne Nahmiash and is designed to be administered to caregivers of elderly individuals. It comprises eight yes or no questions, and can make a handy tool to use in psychosocial assessments if you are a counsellor or a case manager.

Tools included in the list are used in practice and have undergone some form of psychometric testing, with published results. 

Canadian criminal law does not mandate the reporting of elder abuse on a national basis. The Criminal Code1 does not explicitly define “elder abuse” as a discrete crime, nor does it provide any legal mechanism or requirement for the reporting of abuse. Elder abuse, when it forms the substance of a criminal offence, may be reported to a law enforcement agency at the discretion of the reporter, as with any other crime.

The United Nations: Human Rights, 1991.The General Assembly adopted the United Nations Principles for Older Persons.The document outlined specific older person’s Rights regarding: independence, participation, care, self-fulfillment and dignity.

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