As medicine becomes more complex and specialized by the minute, the communication gulf between doctors and their patients is becoming progressively insurmountable. This site provides insight on their beliefs specific multicultural groups. 

Research has identified three basic dimensions in end-of-life treatment that vary culturally: communication of “bad news”; locus of decision making; and attitudes toward advance directives and end-of-life care. In contrast to the emphasis on “truth telling” in the United States, it is not uncommon for health care professionals outside the United States to conceal serious diagnoses from patients, because disclosure of serious illness may be viewed as disrespectful, impolite, or even harmful to the patient.

Quality palliative care helps you honour your culture, spirituality and traditions. At LivingMyCulture.ca, people from various cultures share their stories and wisdom about living with serious illness, end of life and grief to support others.

This review highlights that most research has focused on decision-making. There were fewer studies exploring different cultural and spiritual experiences at the EoL and interventions to improve EoL care. Interventions evaluated were largely educational in nature rather than service oriented.

Within the process of providing end-of-life care, cultural factors can significantly influence patients’ reactions to their illnesses and the decisions they make. As a patient and his or her family transitions from point to point in the process of coping with the serious illness, culture may impact key aspects.

The focus of this article will be on cross-cultural issues at the end of life for ethnically and culturally diverse groups in the United States. The health care provider must have a clear understanding and recognition of the unique and specific influences culture has on a patient’s behavior, attitudes, preferences, and decisions around end-of-life care. 

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brainXchange, Alzheimer Society of Canada and the CCNA proudly presents Dr. Serge Gauthier as he discusses the new and evolving elements of research on dementia. This webinar will take place on Sept. 13th from 12:00 - 13:00 EDT. Registration is free, but spaces are limited.

This information flyer provides facts about Canada's alarming obesity statistics. Included topics are also surgical obesity treatment, childhood obesity, and treatment options in Canada. 

Join them Sept 22nd from 1:30 - 3:30 pm at Kingston General Hospital for a Patient Education session.
This will be led by Dr. Michael Rauh and Elina Cook from Queen's University on the role of the clinical laboratory in personalizing leukemia and lymphoma diagnosis and driving research on the origins of these cancers.

This 3 day conference will explore emerging trends and best practices that include relationship-centred care and highlight innovative ways to build capacity through community engagement, education, research and technology; cultivating compassion and dignity in an aging society.

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