The authors state that the current health care system relies on the assumption that older populations have well-developed skills required for self-management of chronic disease. Clinicians must acknowledge the relationship between cognition and self-management and improve their ability to identify and respond to the causes of treatment non-adherence particularly as they related to dementia.

Alzheimer’s is one of the main forms of dementia, which involves impaired brain function, the loss of short-term memory, and trouble completing even basic, familiar daily tasks. Caring for family members with this disease can take an emotional as well as financial toll on families. Arranging for the care of a person suffering from dementia can be complex and expensive. Adding to that complexity, patients are often unable to manage or understand their finances.

This presentation by Dr. John Puxty provides a summary of age-related changes in memory, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia, delirium and depression in older adults. Last reviewed November 2017. 66 slides.

This article speaks to the role of occupational therapy in assessing the person, the environment, and the occupation of people with dementia to prevent falls while improving independence and participation in daily activities.

This prospective study aimed to identify modifiable risk facts for falling in older people with mild to moderate dementia.

The authors undertook a qualitative study involving thematic analysis to explore the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their family carers, about falling, fall risk and acceptability of fall prevention interventions. 

This in-depth guide is divided into 8 sections with step-by-step guidance to help you make home as safe as possible for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Topics include:  Ensuring safety inside the home, handling social events, communicating effectively, and preparing for emergency situations. 

 

A food blog has put together this comprehensive guide encompassing the cognitive, emotional, and other health-related benefits of cooking for people with Alzheimer’s disease, how to create a safe environment for cooking and baking, ways caregivers can assist to make the activity enjoyable, and addressing eating challenges that may arise among individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease affects about 5.4 million Americans, about 5.2 million of which are 65 and older. It can be your grandparent, your cousin, your sibling or even your parent who faces the diagnosis. Eventually, those with Alzheimer’s require round-the-clock care, and for many families, that means taking the loved one into their own home.

Accurate information and continued research on the aging process are critical as Americans age. This brochure contains information about older Americans and attempts to dispel the myths regarding that age group. What's important to remember about people over age 65 is that while many begin to experience some physical limitations, they learn to live with them and lead happy and productive lives.

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